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Canadian SCI Rehabilitation Introduction

The SCI Rehabilitation Framework C Craven, MD; M Verrier, MHSc; C Balioussis, PhD; J Hsieh, MSc; DL Wolfe, PhD The form and content of the data collection, synthesis and reporting of this scoping review of Canadian SCI rehabilitation stems from the SCI Rehabilitation Framework, (derived from the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health ICF) by the study of investigators. The ICF is a classification system that underlies definition, measurement, and policy formulations in the fields of health and disability. A hybrid of medical and social models of disability, the framework depicts function and disability as interacting factors that relate to the individual, and contextual factors unique to the individual. The dimensions also interact with the environment, which encompasses external factors (such as architectural characteristics, legal and social structures, and climate), and personal factors - or the social context - which relate to the individual and his/her sociocultural surroundings (such as social background, education, profession, experiences, gender and age). The interplay between these factors influences how an individual experiences their SCI-related disability. These concepts are thought to be interactive and dynamic, rather than linear and static. The Framework of SCI Rehabilitation goals displays the goal-oriented nature of SCI rehabilitation service delivery, within the dimensions of body structure and function, activity and participation. The hexagonal “mosaic” tiles of the rehabilitation goals represent the complex interplay of the individual’s unique goals, as well as the interprofessional, multimodal nature of SCI rehabilitation service delivery: the variety of cognitive, physical and medical therapies and diagnostic interventions which target goal attainment. Emphasized is the central role of the individual with SCI, the need to customize and tailor rehabilitation goals and processes, and the consideration of personal factors and the individual’s environment. The strength of the Framework is that it enables distinctions in disease, consequences of disease and contributing factors. The Framework was developed a priori to conduct of the scoping review, using the rehabilitation goals to guide selection of relevant data elements, data collection, collation, and the data reporting process. The following case examples are intended to assist the reader in understanding how the rehabilitation framework is applied and customized care provided for each individual with SCI. In this framework, information is organized into the three ICF dimensions: 1 2 3 Participation Involvement in life situations. Body Structure and Function The physiological and psychological body functions and anatomical body parts, as well as impairments that may occur, as a result of SCI. ActivitY The tasks and actions executed by an individual with SCI. 8 CAPTURING CAPACITY IN CANADIAN SCI REHABILITATION


Canadian SCI Rehabilitation Introduction
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