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R - Community Participation

Examples of objective community participation measures include: • Community Integration Measure (CIQ)10 – Dijkers’ Model Boxes B and C • Craig Handicap and Assessment Reporting Technique (CHART)5 – Dijkers’ Model Boxes B and C. Examples of subjective community participation measures include: • Person-Perceived Participation in Daily Activities (PDAQ)11 – Dijkers’ Model Boxes C, D and E • Reintegration to Normal Living (RNL) Index3 – Dijkers’ Model Boxes C and E • Assessment of Life Habits (LIFE-H)12 – Dijkers’ Model Boxes C and E • Impact on Participation and Autonomy (IPA)13 – Dijkers’ Model Boxes C and E • Adult Needs Assessment Checklist14 – Dijkers’ Model Boxes C, D and E. 2. SCIRE (www.scireproject.com) The Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Evidence (SCIRE) project contains an overview of outcome measures that have established psychometric properties in individuals with SCI. One section coves outcome measures to assess participation and environmental factors. Recently, the SCIRE Outcome Measures Toolkit was produced to facilitate consensus regarding the outcome measures routinely used in clinical practice and research. Recommended participation measures are the Craig Handicap and Assessment Reporting Technique (CHART)5 to assess objective aspects of participation, and the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II15 to assess subjective aspects of participation. Current Canadian Community Participation Practice Profile: Canadian Experts in Community Participation 1. Luc Noreau, PhD (Community Health), Québec City: Works at Laval University and is leading the development of new and novel measures that can be routinely used to assess community participation. 2. Vanessa Noonan, PhD PT (Health Care & Epidemiology), Vancouver: Expertise in measuring participation using the ICF. She is working with Dr. Noreau on the development of new participation measures, and on understanding the relationship among concepts (e.g., body function and structures, activity, participation, environmental factors, personal factors) in the ICF model. 3. Sander L. Hitzig, PhD (Psychology), Toronto: A scientist at University Health Network - Toronto Rehab’s Spinal Cord Rehabilitation Program with expertise on factors that influence community participation, post-SCI. 4. Gary Linassi, MB (Physiatry) FRCPC, Saskatoon: A physiatrist and researcher at the University of Saskatchewan, interested in the transition from inpatient rehabilitation to community following SCI. He is leading a team looking at health care services for, and needs of, individuals with SCI living in the community. The goal of this research is to ensure a continuum of care after transition to the community. 5. Charlene Alton, TR; and Rich VanderWal, TR, Toronto: Recreational therapists at Toronto Rehab’s Spinal Cord Injury Program at Lyndhurst Centre, who have developed a program to promote community participation, based on an interdisciplinary model of care, which has recently undergone formal program evaluation. 6. Sonja McVeigh, MD (Physiatry), Halifax and Rhonda Willms, MD (Physiatry), Vancouver: Related clinical expertise likely to influence practice. COMMNUITY PARTICIPATION | PARTICIPATION 189


R - Community Participation
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