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Physical Activity Module

Spotlight Best Practice Organization Department of Kinesiology – McMaster University, Hamilton Other notable achievements of this group include: 1. Creation of MacWhelers, an exercise rehabilitation program for adults with SCI. 2. Development of the PARA SCI - a standardized tool to assess physical activity participation. 3. Establishment of leisure-time physical activity participation rates and their relationship to various measures of health status and social cognitive predictors. 4. Initiation of Get In Motion , the first-ever physical activity-related telephone counselling service available for Canadians living with SCI - www.sciactioncanada.ca/get-in-motion.cfm. 5. Development of the first Physical Activity Guidelines for Adults with SCI (worldwide) - www.sciactioncanada.ca/guidelines. HOMES Ac t ive HOME STRENGTH-TRAINING GUIDE SCI Get Fit TOOLKIT For people with Tetraplegia A CANADIAN RESOURCE TO HELP ADULTS WITH SPINAL CORD INJURY MEET PHYSICAL ACTIVITY GUIDELINES GUIDELINES AT A glance FOR IMPORTANT FITNESS BENEFITS, ADULTS WITH A SPINAL CORD INJURY SHOULD ENGAGE IN: • At least 20 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity AEROBIC activity 2 times per week, AND • 3 sets of 8-10 repetitions of STRENGTHENING activity for each muscle group 2 times per week. © SCI Action Canada 2012 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY GUIDELINES for Adults with Spinal Cord Injury A group of McMaster researchers, led by Drs. Kathleen Martin Ginis and Audrey Hicks, have directed a series of physical activity-related initiatives. Together, they have conducted randomized, controlled trials of exercise interventions, developed physical activity guidelines for individuals with SCI, and advocated for SCI-specific physical activity resources. In addition, Dr. Martin Ginis led the largest-ever epidemiological study of physical activity and health in individuals with SCI (SHAPE-SCI), and established SCI Action Canada, an alliance of community-based organizations and university-based researchers working together to advance physical activity participation among Canadians living with SCI. Dr. Hicks established the MacWheelers, a community-based fitness program for individuals with SCI which has set the standard for fitness programming for individuals with SCI. Scientists within the Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, have been instrumental in building the knowledge base about physical activity and SCI, and then moving this knowledge into action through direct physical activity programming. student volunters work with INDIVIDUALS with SCI, from the local comunity, in the MacWhelers exercise program. It’s easier than you think BE ACTIVE...safely You may feel physical activity is too difficult. Here are some possible barriers and ways to overcome them. NO TIME: Here are some practical and important tips to avoid injury • Always check with a physician before starting a physical PREAMBLE activity program. • Progress slowly. You are aiming for a little muscle soreness, not intense pain. • Check your skin for pressure sores/ulcers. If this is a concern, try shifting your body weight every 10-15 minutes. Consider equipping your chair with a special cushion to relieve pressure. • Stay cool. Since sweating may be inhibited below the level of injury, spray yourself regularly with a water bottle when exercising in the heat. If indoors, use a fan as well. • Know the signs and symptoms of autonomic dysreflexia (AD). If you think you are experiencing AD, remain sitting up. If you deal with the suspected cause and symptoms don’t go away, call a physician. Visit the SCI Action Canada website for more safety tips. chronic are appropriate for all healthy adults with These guidelines traumatic, including tetraplegia spinal cord injury, traumatic or non-of gender, race, ethnicity or and socioeconomic paraplegia, irrespective to participate in a variety status. Adults are encouraged n There’s a way! Proper adaptation of equipment and activity can accommodate you LACK OF SUPPORT/LACK OF ACCESS of physical activities that are enjoyable and safe. Adults can meet these guidelines through sports, transportation, recreation, occupational demands or planned exercise, in the context of family, work, volunteer, and community activities. The guidelines should be achieved above and beyond the incidental physical activity accumulated in the course of structured rehabilitation or daily living. Following these physical activity guidelines can lead to improved cardiovascular and muscular fitness. The potential benefits far exceed the potential risks associated with physical activity. These guidelines may be appropriate for those with an acute spinal cord injury, who are pregnant, have an active infection, are susceptible to autonomic dysreflexia, or have a chronic medical condition beyond a spinal cord injury; however, they should consult with n Use resources: SCI Action Canada’s Get In Motion Service, the Canadian Wheelchair Sports Association’s Bridging the Gap Program, Active Living Alliance, Canadian Paraplegic Association, the Canadian Paralympic Committee Portal. a health professional to understand the types and amounts of physical activity appropriate for them. For those who are physically inactive, doing amounts below the recommended levels may bring some fitness benefits. For these adults, it is appropriate to start with smaller amounts of physical activity and gradually increase duration, frequency, and intensity as a progression towards meeting the guidelines. www.sciactioncanada.ca/guidelines For important fitness benefits, adults with a spinal cord injury should engage in: At least 20 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity aerobic activity 2 times per week, Experts recommend that all healthy adults spinal cord injury set aside time to be AND with physically active. This part of your day should be enjoyable, so choose activities that you like to do, and make it fun. Try to incorporate both: 1 - Aerobic activity 2 - Strengthening activity Strength training exercises 2 times per week, consisting of 3 sets of 8-10 repetitions of each exercise for each major muscle group. How…? Aerobic Activity Strength Training Activity How often? Two times per week Two times per week How much? Gradually increase your activity so that you are doing at least 20 minutes of aerobic activity during each workout session. Repetitions are the number of times you lift and lower a weight. Try to do 8-10 repetitions of each exercise. This counts as 1 set. Gradually work up to doing 3 sets of 8-10 repetitions of each exercise. These activities should be performed at a moderate to vigorous intensity. Moderate intensity: activities that feel somewhat hard, but you can keep doing them for a while without getting tired. Vigorous intensity: activities that make you feel like you are working really hard, almost at your maximum, and you cannot do these activities for very long without getting tired. Pick a resistance (free weights, cable pulleys, bands, etc.) heavy enough that you can barely, but safely, finish 8-10 repetitions of the last set. Be sure to rest for 1-2 minutes between each set and exercise. There are many ways to reach this goal, including: Upper Body Exercises: wheeling, arm cycling, sports Lower Body Exercises: Body weight supported treadmill walking, cycling Whole Body Exercise: recumbent stepper, water exercise Aim for: AEROBIC ACTIVITY From Moderate to Vigorous. Moderate means somewhat hard, and you feel like you could continue for a long time. You can talk, but not sing your favourite song, during the activity. Using a 0 to 10 scale, moderate-intensity physical activity is usually a 5 or 6. Vigorous is really hard, and you feel like you can only continue for a short time before getting tired. You will not be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath. Using a 0 to 10 scale, vigorous-intensity physical activity is usually a 7 or 8. There are many ways to reach this goal, including: Free weights Elastic resistance bands Cable pulleys Weight machines Functional electrical stimulation How hard? How to? © 2011 McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada STRENGTHENING ACTIVITY You should feel quite challenged (without hurting yourself) by the end of the 3 sets. Take a 1-2 minute rest break between each set. Work each muscle group on alternate days. ACTIVITY IDEAS Wheeling, arm cycling, sports, swimming Free weights, elastic resistance bands, cable pulleys, weight machines n Make an action plan (see previous page) n Be physically active with your family and friends n Got down time? Make it physical activity time PHYSICAL BARRIERS: n Physical activity may reduce your pain n It’s worth it. You’ll feel energized n Get an exercise buddy n Connect with your community recreation centre or municipal recreation department n Try an exercise video such as the Active Homes videos available on the SCI Action Canada website “I CAN’T” n Start with what you know and build your skills n Take a tour of a facility that offers an activity that interests you n Too expensive? There are a number of community-based programs that have adapted equipment available for you to use in their activities. If you are newly injured, are pregnant, prone to autonomic dysreflexia, or have other medical conditions, you should talk to your health professional to find out what types and amount of physical activity are right for you. A health professional might include a doctor, a physiotherapist, or a qualified exercise professional. For a more detailed look at the guidelines and how you can get started, go to www.sciactioncanada.ca YOU ARE NOT ALONE! SCI Action Canada’s website has resources to connect you. QLog allows you to read how SCI Action Canada Community Members lead active lifestyles. Facebook and Twitter provide social networking opportunities. Go to www.sciactioncanada.ca. Funded by: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY | PARTICIPATION 173


Physical Activity Module
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