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P - Informed Self-Management

Self-Management Skil Development and Readines to Learn A primary challenge in facilitating self-management, within rehabilitation programs, is that the individual is not ready to learn, or thinks that some issues (such as secondary health complications) may not be relevant to his or her current or future circumstances – especially, if they are dealing with significant medical and or psychological adjustment issues.6 Furthermore, general skills associated with informed self-management (e.g., barrier identification, action planning, systematic problem solving) may not seem relevant, whereas specific content (e.g., paralysis, loss of sensation, skin care, bowel and bladder management) may be of great significance. Recognizing this limitation, two sites have implemented specific self-management programming, based on an approach developed by Kate Lorig,2 at the Stanford Patient Education Research Centre (http://patienteducation.stanford.edu/programs/). In a workshop series delivered by two trained facilitators (one of which is a peer), each session provides information on relevant topics for managing one’s health, including facilitation and practice of techniques. This ensures that individuals are actively engaged in problem solving and action planning, related to personally relevant goals. This program is available for outpatients and, at one site, includes individuals with stroke and multiple sclerosis, in addition to SCI. Originally targeted for individuals with chronic diseases such as diabetes and arthritis, traditional self-management programs have relevance and value for those with SCI – and may be even more valuable if their content and formats were tailored more specifically to their needs. 162 CAPTURING CAPACITY IN CANADIAN SCI REHABILITATION


P - Informed Self-Management
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