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G - Independence in Breathing

Figure 2.0 Potential Respirator y Consequences of SCI Ineffective Cough Peak Cough Flow Poor Glottic Function  Mucous Plugging Current Key Clinical Questions Weak Respiratory Muscles Poor Coordination Spinal Cord Injury Loss of Compliance/Surfactant Atelectasis Consolidation/Pneumonia Respiratory Failure 1. What are the current resources for respiratory care at Canadian SCI rehabilitation centres? Can all sites support best practice for independence in breathing? 2. Is there equal and fair access to rehabilitation regardless of the respiratory support required? 3. What is the current respiratory rehabilitation management for individuals with high tetraplegia who have ventilation dependency? Vital Capacity  SpO2 / CO2   Evidence-based or best practices should be the standard of rehabilitation respiratory care to prevent early death and long-term complications, and to optimize health in individuals with SCI. Current Practice: Rehabilitation Management of Respiratory Dysfunction Post-SCI Service Providers: Maximizing respiratory function in rehabilitation requires interprofessional collaboration, within a team of healthcare professionals, that includes physicians (physiatrists, respirologists, infectious disease specialists, otolaryngologists), respiratory therapists, pulmonary function technicians, physiotherapists, nurses, occupational therapists, pharmacists, speech language pathologists, dietitians, registered practical nurses, physiotherapy assistants and occupational therapy assistants (Figures 3.0 and 4.0). For individuals who require ventilation, respiratory management will require additional interprofessional care, especially by respiratory therapists, nurses, occupational therapists and wheelchair vendors (Figures 3.0 and 4.0). 76 CAPTURING CAPACITY IN CANADIAN SCI REHABILITATION


G - Independence in Breathing
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