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B - What Does the E-Scan Tell Us

Figure 9.0 Electrodiagnostic Services in SCI Rehabilitation Sites (n = 13) Figure 10.0 Laborator y Services for SCI Rehabilitation Sites (n = 12) Figure 11.0 Resources for Comunity Integration 0 20 40 60 80 100 Community Coordina on/Liaison Voca onal Counselling Transi onal Living Training (ILU) Accessible Housing Consulta on Percent (%) Community Integra on Resources Serving Inpa ents Serving Outpa ents Serving Inpa ents and Outpa ents Figure 12.0 Resources for Comunity Integration that Assist Individuals with Housing and Emplo yment 0 5 10 15 Community Coordinaon/ Liaison Vocaonal Counselling Transional Living Training (ILU) Accessible Housing Consultaon Number of Sites Community Integraon Resources Have the Service Serve Inpaents and Outpaents Serve Outpaents Serve Inpaents On-Site Off-Site Internal Off-Site External 0 5 10 15 20 Wound Swab Urine Tissue Culture Stool Sputum Semen Analysis CSF Blood Laboratory Tes€ng Services Arterial Blood Gases Number of Sites For individuals with SCI, whether the cause is traumatic or non-traumatic, or the incident is of sudden onset or insidious, the consequences are the same. Therefore, rehabilitation site resources that assist individuals to enhance health, quality of life and wellbeing, are essential and should be universally accessible. The E-scan was conceptualized within a framework of data fields to address health, quality of life and wellbeing. The resources, for this full suite of rehabilitation services, were incorporated in the data collection, and abstracted to demonstrate what is required, to ensure that inpatient rehabilitation transitions smoothly, from discharge to outpatient care. Figures 11.0 and 12.0 show how well prepared are the SCI rehabilitation sites, for ensuring this transition and facilitation to community integration. Chapters on Community Participation, Emotional Wellbeing and Employment and Vocation discuss, in detail, the approaches taken, important aspects of community participation that influence health and wellbeing, how a full spectrum of service delivery integrates with community life, and highlights best practices that make a difference, in the lives of individuals with SCI. Despite the large number of sites, with access to a number of SCI Discharge Planning/Discharge Services, many do not have facilities onsite, which limit their usefulness and availability. Clearly, the rehabilitation field needs to ensure a model of SCI rehabilitation care that provides a full spectrum of services, to demonstrate that Canadian rehabilitation is an international forerunner in community integration. References 1. Couris CM, Guilcher SJT, Munce SEP, et al. Characteristics of adults with incident traumatic spinal cord injury in Ontario, Canada. Spinal Cord. 2010;48(1):39-44. 2. Ho CH, Wuermser LA, Priebe MM, Chiodo AE, Scelza WM, Kirshblum SC. Spinal cord injury medicine. 1. Epidemiology and classification. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007;88(3 Suppl 1):S49-54. 3. Guilcher SJT, Munce SEP, Couris CM, et al. Healthcare utilization in non-traumatic and traumatic spinal cord injury: a population-based study. Spinal Cord. 2010;48(1):45-50. 4. Wilson JR, Singh A, Craven C, et al. Early versus late surgery for traumatic spinal cord injury: the results of a prospective Canadian cohort study published online ahead of print May 8 2012. Spinal Cord. 2012. http://www.nature.com/sc/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ sc201259a.html 5. Munce SEP, Wodchis WP, Guilcher SJT, et al. Direct costs of adult traumatic spinal cord injury in Ontario published online ahead of print July 17 2012. Spinal Cord. 2012. http://www.nature.com/sc/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/sc201281a.html 44 CAPTURING CAPACITY IN CANADIAN SCI REHABILITATION


B - What Does the E-Scan Tell Us
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